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Archive for August, 2019

Winner: young Dave (aka SchaeferMan)
then Pluto and Carol St. Martin

It has been a long time since young Dave won a game. Much longer and he wouldn’t be young Dave anymore.

Dave had the game in hand, then blew the last question to fall into a 3 way tie. The playoff didn’t last long.

What color did the Rolling Stones use in their famous Tuesday song? You would think this one would be easy for the 2 boomers, but you would be wrong. Only Dave knew it was Ruby Tuesday.

Good Question!: A little less than half the size of Great Britain, what is Europe’s second largest island?

Choices: a. Ireland   b. Scotland   c. Wales   d. Iceland

Answer: Iceland

A number of players have been to both Ireland and Iceland with Main Street Café sponsored trips, so this should have been an easy question. Surprisingly, many players thought Ireland was larger. At 103,000 square km Iceland is about 50% larger than Ireland and close to the size of New York State. We must’ve been fooled by the difference in population, where Ireland is 15 times larger than Iceland.

Iceland is filled with natural wonders. One of the famous spots is The Blue Lagoon, a geothermal spa in southwestern Iceland.

Creatures from the Blue Lagoon.

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In this land of Fire and Ice there are more waterfalls than you could imagine, with one more beautiful than the next.

But don’t just take my word for it, check out this wonderful scenic video:

 

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Winner: Rosebud

then Carol St. Martin, Almond Joy, Chris, Tiff, and Oh, Donna.

A surprise game tonight when the Village cancelled “Family Night” due to bad weather. Neither rain nor wind keeps us from a game.

Rosebud won this one going away. A couple of women newbies at the back table were very enthusiastic all game long and sure enough, they finished tied for third. Their lament: “If only there had been more Justin Bieber questions.”

A beaming Tiffany was back to moderate the game in the absence of Mistress Daphne, who is in Alaska searching for the last of the Polar Bears. Nadia, the mad scientist, and Jonny Appleseed rejoined us after an extended absence. He has been busy helping to build Barry Diller’s futuristic new $250M park on the Hudson River at Pier 55. It’s a fascinating project. You should talk to him about it.

It’s late as Nadia consoles a sleepy Jonny Appleseed on his poor performance.

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Good Question!: What was traditionally made by a Chandler?

Choices: a. light bulbs   b. chandeliers   c. candles   d. matchsticks

Answer: candles

“Lighting The Way – A Brief History of Chandlery

Candles in history

Quick, think of an essential skill. A truly vital job, something society can’t do without. It’s very unlikely that you instantly thought of ‘chandler’ as an essential job – but for much of history, it very much was! From the humblest of rural cottages to the grandest of palatial fortresses, everyone relied on candles (and the people who made them) to continue living life after dark.

Tallow Fueled Candles For Centuries

For most of human history, candles were mostly made from tallow fat. In other words, waste material from meat! This meant that historic chandlers would generally have to have a strong stomach, in order to deal with everything that entailed. For easy access to tallow fat, most chandleries would be situated next to tanneries and abattoirs.

Candles in religion

Beeswax was a special option, as candles made from beeswax burned purely and cleanly, with none of the horrible smell. But it took a dizzying amount of beeswax to make a single 4” candle, which meant it was very expensive. For that reason – as well as a symbolic significance – it was mostly used in churches.

Can’t talk about candles without thinking of Elton John’s “Candle in the Wind” and Diana, Princess of Wales.

The Gradual Evolution Chandlery

Thankfully, the usage of tallow declined towards the end of the 17th century. A few alternative materials were even found, like whale blubber. (Oh. We were hoping for something nicer.) Then in the late 19th century, gas lighting arrived, replaced itself by electricity just a few decades later. As a result, most commercial chandlers were basically made redundant, forced to move into other trades.

Today we have moved on from candles which were essentially fat, which gave off a particularly unpleasant smell, to the beautiful scents of our own handmade candles.” (themeltco.com)

and don’t forget: “better to light a single candle than to curse the darkness”

If you always wondered about Medieval candle making here it is:

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