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Posts Tagged ‘Chau’

Winner: Rosebud, followed by Chau, 10 O’Clock Bill, Pluto, and Almond Joy

Log jam at the top tonight. Initially Almond Joy was declared the winner, but always a man of character, he acknowledged that he had an additional wrong answer, which dropped him into a five way tie for first place. The play off quickly developed into a two-way contest between newbie Chau, visiting from LA, and old timer Rosebud – a classic East Coast versus West Coast battle. After nine tough rounds Rosebud emerged victorious, when only she knew that the largest North American rodent was the beaver.

Good Question!: True or false: the temperature on the moon is roughly the same all day?

Choice’s: a. True   b. False

Answer: False

“Are you planning a trip to the Moon and you’re wondering what kinds of temperature you might experience. Well, you’re going to want to pack something to keep you warm, since the temperature of the Moon can dip down to -153°C during the night. Oh, but you’re going to want to keep some cool weather clothes too, since the temperature of the Moon in the day can rise to 107°C.

“Why does the moon’s temperature vary so widely? It happens because the Moon doesn’t have an atmosphere like the Earth. Here on Earth, the atmosphere acts like a blanket, trapping heat. Sunlight passes through the atmosphere, and warms up the ground. The energy is emitted by the ground as infrared radiation, but it can’t escape through the atmosphere again easily so the planet warms up. Nights are colder than days, but it’s nothing like the Moon.

There’s another problem. The moon takes 27 days to rotate once on its axis. So any place on the surface of the Moon experiences about 13 days of sunlight, followed by 13 days of darkness. So if you were standing on the surface of the Moon in sunlight, the temperature would be hot enough to boil water. And then the Sun would go down, and the temperature would drop 250 degrees in just a matter of moments.

To deal with this dramatic range in temperature, spacesuits are heavily insulated with layers of fabric and then covered with reflective outer layers. This minimizes the temperature differences between when the astronaut is in the sunlight and when in shade. Space suits also have internal heaters and cooling systems, and liquid heat exchange pumps that remove excess heat.” (universetoday.com)

Enough of the science, let’s listen to the Dark Side of the Moon:

 

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