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Posts Tagged ‘Elaine’

Winner: Elaine, then Alan, Pluto, Rosebud, and Erin

A school holiday week meant we had a full house tonight. 31 players and that didn’t include the group of Marines who had landed in Main Street after a funeral. It was quite loud but that didn’t seem to bother Elaine who played a steady game and barely edged the four players nipping at her heels. Erin played with a table of whiz kids in the back and brought some youth to the winners podium.

Good Question!: What sticky sweetener was traditionally used as an anti-septic ointment for cuts and burns?

Choices: a. aloe   b. crushed sugar cane   c. honey   d. molasses

Answer: honey

This was news to some of us, but maybe it shouldn’t have been.
The medicinal importance of honey has been documented in the world’s oldest medical literatures, and since ancient times it has been known to possess antimicrobial property as well as wound-healing activity.

The ancient Egyptians not only made offerings of honey to their gods, they also used it as an embalming fluid and a dressing for wounds. Today, many people swarm to honey for its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Holistic practitioners consider it one of nature’s best all-around remedies.

The healing property of honey is due to the fact that it offers antibacterial activity, maintains a moist wound condition, and its high viscosity helps to provide a protective barrier to prevent infection.

Dark honey is better

Honey comes in many varieties, depending on the floral source of pollen or nectar gathered and regurgitated by the honey bee upon arrival in the hive. Shop for honey and you’ll see that some are lighter, others are darker. In general, the darker the honey, the better its antibacterial and antioxidant power.

It is important to understand that you cannot go around squeezing regular store bought honey on every wound or infection you encounter. Instead, try using manuka honey, which on top of serving as a healthier edible substitute for regular honey, also possess numerous therapeutic qualities. Medical grade honeys have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing several life-threatening infections to humans. Now that’s sweet.

Never Give Honey to an Infant

Honey is natural and considered harmless for adults. But pediatricians strongly caution against feeding honey to children under 1 year old.

That’s because of the risk of botulism. The spores of the botulism bacteria are found in dust and soil that may make their way into honey. Infants do not have a developed immune system to defend against infection.

“It’s been shown very clearly that honey can give infants botulism,” a paralytic disorder in which the infant must be given anti-toxins and often be placed on a respirator in an intensive care unit. So be careful out there – no honey for infants.

If you wonder how bees make honey, this is a wonderful short video.

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Winner: Elaine, followed by Rosebud and the Driver.

Well, it happened again. Another late game collapse by the Driver who was cruising along headed for a sure win. With only three questions left he only had to get one right to win, but he didn’t. Elaine played a steady game and emerged a first time winner, probably because she knew that it was Cardi B who sang “I like It.” The Driver thought Cardi B was a blackjack dealer in Vegas.

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Two of our regulars, Jacqui and Rinne, also knew all about Cardi B and might have won this game if only they didn’t have to get back to work. You see they had snuck out during a break from work to play as much of the game as time allowed. Better luck next time ladies.

Good Question! : What type of metal makes the strongest magnets?

Choices: a. steel   b. iron   c. carbon steel   d. tungsten

Answer: iron

Actually, the strongest available permanent magnets consist of compounds of neodymium, a rare earth metal with atomic number of 60 and symbol of Nd.

Commercial magnets are actually made of an alloy of neodymium, iron, and boron. Alloys of different elements make stronger, longer-lasting magnets because pure magnetic materials usually demagnetize quickly. The reason is that the magnetic forces favor breaking up the domains into ones whose magnetizations point different ways and cancel out.

Video: Super-strong neodymium magnets crushing a man’s hand (not for the sqeamish, you may need to turn away at about the two minute mark.)

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Medical Applications

For reasons that range from the basic “What if?” of pure science to the need to improve medical imaging devices, tremendous efforts are under way to develop more powerful magnets.

MRI and fMRI technology uses a powerful magnetic field to line up the body’s cellular nuclei like compass needles. Another, less powerful magnet then spins the nuclei–like toy tops–generating a measurable signal that computers can read and transform into a 3D visual image. The more powerful the magnets are, the more nuclei that respond. Unlike X-rays, which provide images of bones and hard tissues, MRIs primarily focus on soft tissues.

Magnetic Fields – good or bad?

The expanding medical uses of magnets raises an obvious question: Are magnetic fields good or bad for the human body? There has been plenty of debate in recent years over the effects of living near high-voltage powerlines. But since magnetic-field strength falls off rather rapidly, someone living just 50 ft. from a transmission line would likely experience no more than 2 milligauss. The latest research finds no reason to believe that this level of exposure could have a deleterious impact on the body.

Conversely, researchers have found no positive impact from the wearable magnets commonly sold as cure-alls for numerous ailments, including arthritis. But that hasn’t prevented people across the globe from buying them as remedies.

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