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Posts Tagged ‘Judy’

Winner: Judge Judy, then Carol St. Martin, Pluto, Oh Donna, and Tom Twin

Carol St. Martin, still under the weather, still recovering from her bout with pneumonia, hung in there to tie Judge Judy. The playoff was decided with a most intriguing question – which type of sexual activity is popular with about 25% of participants?

Carol answered “menage a trois,” which seemed quite reasonable, but was not correct. Surprisingly, shockingly, Judy knew immediately. She did not hesitate as she wrote down her answer, which is just a bit too X-rated for this publication. Can you guess what it is?

With Daphne on a slow boat somewhere, and Mike among the missing, it fell to Tiffany to moderate tonight’s game. Fortunately she did not put the questions together.

Good Question!: What is the longest river in the U.S.?

Choices: a. Missouri   b. Mississippi   c. Rio Grande   d. Colorado

Answer: Missouri

What the heck happened! Did the Mississippi shrink since we were kids? Maybe the Missouri needs a better PR guy.

Almost everyone got this one wrong. It’s a close call and here’s the scoop.

According to the USGS, Missouri River stretches for 2,341 miles from source to mouth the river beats out the Mississippi River as the longest river in the US. The river starts flowing from the Rocky Mountains in Western Montana and drains into the Mississippi River. The earliest commercial use of the river was during the fur trade.

The Mississippi River is the second largest river in the US, stretching for 2,202 miles. Its source is in the Lake Itasca in Minnesota, and its mouth is the Gulf of Mexico. The River had important navigation value, the reason why various powers such as France, Spain, and Native American Indians fought to control it. The introduction of steamboats in the early 18th century revolutionized trade along the river. The Mississippi River played an important commercial role when the US was constitutionally established.

Next longest would be the Yukon River (1,979), then the Rio Grande (1,759), and the Colorado River (1,450).

LONGEST RIVERS IN THE WORLD

Determining the world’s longest river is not an easy task. Although for most of us, the answer would be the Nile River, there is a section of scholars who regard the Amazon River as the true winner of this title. The difficulty in declaring a unanimous winner lies in the fact that the determination of the headwaters or the origin of a river is often quite challenging. Large rivers like the Nile and Amazon have numerous sources and many large and small tributaries. The need to find the furthest source of a river is there if the true length of the river has to be calculated. Often, such sources are located in remote and inaccessible locations, rendering the discovery of such sources an arduous task.

The Amazon River is undoubtedly the largest river in the world by discharge volume of water. However, its position as the longest river in the world is highly disputed as the title has for long been granted to the Nile River in Egypt. The dispute arises from the determination of the origin of the Amazon. Until now, the headwaters of the Apurímac River were considered to be the origin of the Amazon River. However, a recent 2014 study claims that the origin of the Amazon can be traced to the Cordillera Rumi Cruz from where Peru’s Mantaro River originates. Now it is estimated that the length of the Amazon is 4,325 miles, which would make it the world’s longest river.

My favorite river is the Chattooga River, where they filmed the scenes for the movie Deliverance.

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Editor’s Note: This month marks the start of the 10th year of the Tuesday Night Bar Exam blog. Over the years we have had 345 posts and almost 47,000 page views. You keep reading, we’ll keep writing.

 

 

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Winner: Judge Judy, followed by Rosebud and Honest Alix.

Yes, that is a giant stock pot that Judge Judy is holding. Good thing a guy didn’t win this evening, he wouldn’t know what to do with the pot. We were all happy to welcome Darin back this evening, looking fit as a fiddle.

Pluto, who’s always whining about the lack of sports questions, missed an easy tennis question. He said he had spent too much time in the sun at the US Open and his brain was still frazzled.

Mistress Daphne and the Driver stopped by. Seems they had a short layover in Northport after their return from the land of the Inca and before their journey to Japan. They were kind enough to bring back a bottle of Pisco sour for us to sample – very nice.

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Good Question!: A heavily used subway station, destroyed when the twin towers collapsed, finally reopened Saturday. What is the name of the station?

Choices: a. One World Trade   b. Rector St.   c. Park Place   d. Cortlandt St.

Answer: Cortlandt St.

Finally!

When the twin towers fell on Sept. 11, 2001, they came crashing down on the Cortlandt Street subway stop on the No. 1 line. The station was buried under debris, its sturdy beams bent like paper clips.

For nearly 17 years, the station has sat unused, even as a new sprawling World Trade Center complex has sprouted aboveground.

At long last, the station reopened at noon Saturday Sept. 8 with transit officials, politicians and eager riders gathering to welcome it back. To put this 17 year station reconstruction in perspective, the original IRT subway line from City Hall all the way to 145th St., took only four years to build when it opened in 1904. It included 28 stations!

The new subway stop, dubbed WTC Cortlandt, is sleek, bright and airy, and bears little resemblance to its old, dank self. The new station has been constructed in the footprint of the old one, but will have some of the modern improvements found at newer subway stops—notably wheelchair access, and air tempering, which keeps platforms cooler on brutally hot days. (It’s already in use at the 1 stop at South Ferry, along with the Second Avenue subway stops.)

There’s also a new piece of art: Ann Hamilton created an installation, titled “Chorus,” that incorporates text from the Declaration of Independence, and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which can be seen on the platform level.

The new station is part of the larger World Trade Center Transportation Hub, which links multiple subway lines across several stations (the Fulton Street transit center, the E at World Trade Center, and the R at Cortlandt Street among them) and the PATH. Though the Oculus, the most visible piece of the WTC hub, cost more than $4 billion, the new Cortlandt station had a comparatively low price tag of $158 million.

The Oculus

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Quite close to the Cortlandt St. station is One WTC and this is a wonderful photo gallery showing 1WTC from start to finish:

From Cornerstone to Skyscraper: One World Trade Center

 

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Winner, Mar.13: Judge Judy, followed by Tall Paul, and Eric

Judge Judy and Tall Paul, returned from their Florida furlough having spent the entire time buried in their Funk and Wagnalls, were now ready to take on all comers. The rest of us had spent our time digging out of snowdrifts. We didn’t stand a chance.

Winner, Mar. 06: Pluto , followed by Rosebud, TomTwin, and Almond Joy

Pluto and Rosebud tied in regulation. The deciding play off question: “Which was the largest ethnic group passing through Ellis Island from 1890 to 1915?” Pluto knew it was the Italians, because that’s when his people came over. Talking to himself he wondered in a soft voice if it had anything to do with potatoes. Rosebud fell for it and answered: the Irish. Almond Joy was impressed and said: “I haven’t seen that old “potato” fake used in a long time.”

Good Question!: How many lines should a limerick have?

Choices: a. 3   b. 5   c. 7   d. 9

“There once was a man from Nantucket

Who kept all his cash in a bucket.

But his daughter, named Nan,

Ran away with a man,

And as for the bucket, Nantucket.”

Answer: 5

Limerick poetry has never been given a deserving place among the cultivated forms of poetry. The subject matter of major Limerick poetry is of humorous nature and the length of limerick poems is short and sweet (just five lines!!) that is why it is loved to be read by people all around the world.

Here are a few more famous limericks:

(a sequel to Nantucket)

But he followed the pair to Pawtucket,
The man and the girl with the bucket;
And he said to the man,
He was welcome to Nan,
But as for the bucket, Pawtucket.

———————————————————

There was a young gal name of Sally
Who loved an occasional dally.
She sat on the lap
Of a well-endowed chap
Crying, “Gee, Dick, you’re right up my alley!”

——————————————————-

There once was a mockingbird, Clyde,
who bragged of his prowess, but lied.
To his new wife he sighed,
“When again, gentle bride?”
“Nevermore!” bright-eyed Raven replied.

—————————————————–

 

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WINNER: 9 O’Clock Judy, followed by Coffee Bill, Carol St. Martin and Mike

A very large group of players tonight including a surprise return by an old time player – Coffee Bill. He came so close to winning and making his return a storybook finish.

Maybe next time he’ll let his old buddies, the Driver and Pluto know in advance that he’s coming, so they can buy him a beer. Of course, maybe he didn’t let them know intentionally, because if they had been there, he knows they would’ve kicked his butt in the game.

We learned some weird stuff tonight. Turns out that horse meat outsells lamb in Sweden and that in Lebanon it is legal to have sex with female animals. Yuck.

Good Question!: What name translates in Indian as “place of drunkenness?”

Choices: a. Los Angeles  b. Manhattan  c. Utah  d. Denver

Answer: Manhattan

Here’s one version.
When Dutch settlers brought liquor to the island, they offered it to the American Indians they found there. Because American Indians had no history of alcohol use, the liquor had a significant effect on them.
The Native Americans, then called the island “Manahachtanienk,” meaning, “place where we all got drunk.”

Another version has the name starting much earlier. Could’ve been in 1524 when Giovanni Verrazano the Florentine explorer landed for the first time at what is now the lower extremity of New York City. He gave the Indians their first taste of fire water. A good time was had by all, and ever after the natives referred to the island as Manna-ha-ta or “place of drunkenness.”

Or maybe it just got its name after one St. Patrick’s Day.

Manhattan on Sale – Only $24

Peter Minuit, the Dutch West India company director-general, came to New Netherland in 1626 to broker a deal with the American Indians, who occasionally used the land to hunt and fish. In exchange for the island of Manhattan, Minuit offered the tribe a chest of beads and other trinkets worth 60 guilders. In the 19th century, this amount was famously estimated to be about $24; however, that number is disputed. If we assume that the Dutch bought Manhattan for a few cents an acre, it would be a steal comparable to the United States’ purchases of Alaska or the Louisiana Territory. On the other hand, it seems like a raw deal for the American Indians. But many historians point out that the Dutch are the ones who got conned. The American Indians didn’t have the same sense of land ownership as the Dutch did. They didn’t even live on the island.

In any case, the American Indians accepted payment for land they didn’t consider theirs. And it should be noted that the Dutch offering payment at all was a sign of good faith to legitimize their claims, especially compared to the Spanish conquistadors who opted simply to take the land they wanted.

My favorite “Manhattan” story is Woody Allen’s.

Looking for a real old-time film of Manhattan, then try “Manhatta,” but be forewarned, this is a very old B&W film.

In 1920 Paul Strand and artist Charles Sheeler collaborated on Manhatta, a short silent film that presents a day in the life of lower Manhattan. Inspired by Walt Whitman’s book Leaves of Grass, the film includes multiple segments that express the character of New York. The sequences display a similar approach to the still photography of both artists. Attracted by the cityscape and its visual design, Strand and Sheeler favored extreme camera angles to capture New York’s dynamic qualities. Although influenced by Romanticism in its view of the urban environment, Manhatta is considered the first American avant-garde film.

 

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Winner: Judge Judy

Tonight it came down to the last question. Where did the small private plane crash land this week? Pluto guessed Bellmore and was half right. Judge Judy answered Bellport and was totally right. It was especially fitting that Judy would win this evening as she celebrated her wedding anniversary with Tall Paul.

Tonight we learned that Minnie Mouse’s cat who enjoyed antagonizing Mickey’s beloved dog, Pluto was named Figaro. But most of the questions tonight were baby questions – wonder why.

Good question!: Babies recognize their mother’s voice at birth, how long does it take a baby to recognize its father’s voice?

Choices: a. 12 hours  b. 2 days  c. one week  d. two weeks

 

Answer: two weeks

That answer did not sit well with the fathers who were playing the game this evening. Maybe they had a legitimate beef.

Here’s what “Romper,” a site for a new generation of women figuring out what motherhood means for them, has to say:

“It’s no secret that mother’s have the advantage when it comes to bonding with baby. From carrying to delivering to breastfeeding, mother’s are innately wired to feel connected with their babies. Although fathers don’t have the same constant contact that mothers do with their babies, it doesn’t lessen the importance of their bond with their child. It’s been said that babies recognize their mother’s voice while their still in the womb, but when does a baby recognize their father? Not surprisingly, it may be much earlier than you’d expect.

Although the exact timeline isn’t known for sure, some studies suggest babies can recognize their father’s voice from the womb, and suggest that dads talk to their babies before they’re born. One piece from Parents noted that babies can hear sounds from 16 weeks gestation, so speaking or singing often to your unborn babe will increase their ability to recognize the sound of your voice. Most research, according to Parenting, indicates that babies can recognize their father’s voice from 32 weeks gestation (and immediately after birth.)”

On the other hand “Livestrong.com” has this to say:

Because it’s noisy inside the womb and because outside sounds aren’t heard as well as internal sounds, there’s no proof that babies recognize Dad’s voice at birth. Few studies have tested a baby’s preference for their own father’s voice over other male voices. A 1999 Virginia Tech study published in “Developmental Psychobiology” found that 4-month-old infants did not show a preference for their father’s voice over other male voices but did recognize voices they’d heard previously. Researchers concluded that there is a biological difference in maternal vs. paternal recognition in infants.

So you pays your money and you takes your choice.

All this baby talk has got me thinking about “Rosemary’s Baby:

 

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Winner: 9 O’Clock Judy with Eric a close 2nd.

A close game all the way with 3 players tied and headed to a playoff. The Driver bowed out early when he failed to name all the figures on Mt. Rushmore. Then it took 5 more questions before Judy knocked out Eric to finally win the game.

Darin served an authentic Caribbean drink along with some very fine brownies. She brought the necessary ingredients back from the islands for the exotic “Mama Juana”, did some voodoo magic with it, and it all turned out fine.

Good Question!: What kind of mine do the dwarfs from ‘Snow White and Seven Dwarfs’ work in?

Choices: a. gold   b. diamonds   c. coal   d. uranium

Answer: diamonds

The Dwarf’s Mine is the workplace of the seven dwarfs in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Every morning, the dwarfs leave their cottage and march to the mine, where they dig for diamonds. The reason for this is never explained (this is made reference to in “Heigh-Ho“, in which the dwarfs sing that they “don’t know what we dig ’em for”). Each dwarf has a specific job: Grumpy, Happy, Bashful and Sneezy dig; Sleepy transports the diamonds to Doc, who determines which diamonds should be kept; rejected diamonds are swept up and thrown away by Dopey. The dwarfs return home late every evening. As they leave for, and return from, work, the dwarfs sing “Heigh-Ho“.

Better to just watch the Dwarfs at work:

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Blogger’s Note:

3 TNBE regulars – the Driver, Pluto, and Mike, the mild moderator – riding as the Main Street Peddlers, joined 32,000 of their closest friends in NYCity on Sunday for the 40th anniversary, 40 mile Five Boro Bike Tour. Here are a few images from the day:

The riders go off in 4 waves. This was our wave.

A bit congested at the start. We thought we were going to be walking the whole 40 miles.

After 30+ miles, the big bridge to Staten Island and the finish are just ahead.

For some, the big bridge meant time for a stroll.

For Pluto it was a good time to get off his bike and take a scenic photo. Actually, he thought that every time he was struggling to cross a bridge.

One of the old-time car ferries brought back into service for us.

At Fraunces Tavern celebrating our finish.

 

 

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Winners: Judy and Paul

Tonight’s game was very close. Judy and Paul won, but finished barely ahead of everyone else – all the other players finished either second or third. One table of players was made up of guys from the local rescue squad. Even they had trouble with one medical question and did not know that measles can sometimes have a deadly complication occurring years after the infection. So better get your vaccine.

Good question!: What is the largest edible fruit native to the U.S.?

Choices: a.Apple   b.Tomato   c.PawPaw  d.Watermelon

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Answer: PawPaw

Here’s what Andrew Moore, author of “Pawpaw” has to say on the topic.

“Though the pawpaw grows wild in 26 states, the fruit remains a mystery to many Americans. This wasn’t actually always the case. At one time Americans were entirely familiar with pawpaws, going back to the Native Americans, who ate the fruit, who used the tree’s fiber for cordage and rope, on down through the earliest explorers, colonists and pioneers. The pawpaw was an important fruit and food item each year in late summer.

In many ways it’s a tropical fruit that has willed itself to grow in the temperate North, to grow where it probably shouldn’t. We know that over millennia it evolved to be here, but it is the only member of the tropical custard apple family that’s not found in the tropics.

The “pawpaw belt” is a term I use to refer to the states and regions where the pawpaw is native, where it grows wild. That encompasses parts of 26 eastern states. It spans from southern Louisiana to Ontario, Canada, from the Atlantic west to the Mississippi, and into Oklahoma and even Nebraska.

What happened? Why did the pawpaw disappear from our tables?

That’s the big question. That was the mystery that I was trying to get at in the book: How did Americans forget about this and why? The easiest way to explain it is that when Americans stopped going to the woods for food, they stopped knowing the pawpaw.

What does a pawpaw taste like?
The pawpaw is commonly described as a cross between a mango and banana. That’s true. But the first thing I like to describe is the texture. It has this tropical custard texture. That’s more similar to fruits you find in the Caribbean, fruits like guanabana and cherimoya, custard apples.

The best thing you can do with a ripe, fresh pawpaw is just to eat it out of hand. Cut it in half, scoop it out and eat it like a custard in a cup, which is essentially what it is.”

 

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